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. speaker john boehner meets this morning with house republicans who are angry at his new pitch to raise $800 billion in tax revenue in the fiscal cliff negotiations. president obama has said there will be no deal unless taxes are raised on the wealthiest americ americans. but staunch conservatives don't want any kind of new taxes. that's where speaker boehner's job gets really tough. on piers morgan tonight newt gingrich said if all else fails, go over the cliff. >> i think that no deal is better than a bad deal. i think going off this cliff is less dangerous than letting things build up for a year or two years to an even bigger cliff. i think that the president clearly has staked out a position of nonseriousness. and i think that it's very difficult for the house republicans right now to find any practical way to get his attention. so, he just won an election. he is feeling very good about himself. he is posturing brilliantly, putting the republicans in a corner. they need to relax. they don't have an election until november 2014. >> senior congressional correspondent dana bash joins m
john boehner. the reason they're here and want their voices heard if, indeed, this worst-case scenario happens, this fiscal cliff as we've been calling it, it will impact their state's economies. according to the ppew report, these states rely on federal money. things like education would be impacted. they're here to put pressure not only on the president but lawmakers up on the hill to get this deal done. >> takes place in about an hour. dan loathian, reporting from th white house. >>> nearly 15 million households rely on food stamps. republicans say it's far too many. it's government assistance out of control. certainly a major theme during the republican primary. >> president obama has been historically the most effective food stamp president in american histor history. >> in light of the continuing controversy over food stamps, new jersey democratic mayor cory book booker will live on food stamps saying, quote, nutrition is not a responsibility of the government. >> as you mentioned this all sort of began as a back and forth on twitter. we'll get to that in detail in a moment. firs
. that's what house speaker john boehner told fellow republicans during a weekly meeting, signaling he will push back on president obama's demand for tax hikes on the rich when it comes to the fiscal cliff. but treasury secretary timothy geithner says the white house will not give in. >> no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest americans. remember it's only 2%. >> geithner adds the obama administration is, quote, absolutely prepared to go off the cliff, if necessary. joining me now is van jones, cnn contributor and former obama administration official. good morning. >> god morning to you. >> so, van, i guess my first question that's eatsy for geithner to say, we're perfectly willing to go off the fiscal cliff. that means a tax hike on middle class americans and maybe some of them are thinking this morning i'm not really so happy geithner said that. >> it might have been inartful for him to say it the way he said it. i think he is making a very important point, which is that the american people did vote. they voted for the one
. the fiscal cliff stalemate or n not, we don't know if they can come to an agreement at all. >> john boehner said we are at a stalemate, is that how you would describe things? >> i think we are far apart but we are moving closer together. >> the leading republican predicts doom and gloom. >> i think we are going over the cliff. it is pretty clear to me they have made a political calculation. >> coming up, a conservative host says the whole fiscal cliff is bogus and we should go ahead and let the country fall over that cliff. >>> the kansas city chiefs won their second game of the season today. it was a game that the coaches and owners decided to play even though the team was rocked by the news that one of their own committed suicide shortly after allegedly killing his girlfriend. >> it was very emotional, but you saw brothers stick together, coaches stick together and everybody stayed strong. this is a great team win. >> reporter: do you think the tragedy had something to do with your team playing better today? >> honestly, if we can erase yesterday, that would be a great blessing, but i thi
on house speaker john boehner. speaker boehner a key republican and after his meeting with geithner this morning, boehner said these urgent talks haven't moved forward in two weeks. keep in mind, they need to get it done by january 1st and here's boehner getting grumpy with cnn's kate baldwin. take a look. >> to this point, most -- most public statements have been optimistic, confident, hopeful. we're all sensing a very different tone from you right now. are you walking away from talks? have things completely broken down, mr. speaker? >> no, no, no. stop. i got to tell you. i'm disappointed in where we are and disappointed in what's happened over the last couple of weeks. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious, as well. >> all right. so once again, here are the cliff notes right here. republicans on the hill are demanding trillions of dollars worth of debt reduction. that's pretty much fine with democrats who say the wealthy should foot the bill in the form of higher tax rat
's go to washington. john boehner is reswrekting the president's michelle proposal involving the fiscal cliff. let's lisp in. >> the president in the coming days. during the campaign the president pledged to american people that he would seek a balanced approach to addressing the debt with a combination of new revenues and spending cuts. the day after the election i said the republican majority would accept new revenue as part of a balanced approach that includes real spending cuts and reforms. now, the white house took three weeks to respond with any kind of a proposal, and much to my disappointment, it wasn't a serious one. still, i'm willing to move forward in good faith. our original framework still stands. instead of raising tax rates, we can produce similar amount of revenue, reforming the tax code to close loopholes and lower tax rates. it's far better for the economy when the american people paver on that approach by 2-1. they favor it eep more when we can also show them that real spending cuts will, in fact, reduce the deficit. now, there have been many conversations over the l
's in a meeting with house speaker john boehner and mitch mcconnell, top republican in the senate, as well as nancy pelosi, the top democrat in the house. now coming out of the meeting with senator reid, i'm not getting much at the moment from sources but one democratic aide tells me the following. he says that we -- this aide told me, we're all on the same page today. it's more about republicans. that goes without saying, because these negotiations really were focusing on the negotiations between the white house and speaker boehner, even before the meeting, which the treasury secretary and speaker boehner, a spokesman gave us this following statement, ashleigh. i want to read to you. he says, we accepted this meeting with the expectation that the white house team will bring a specific plan for real spending cuts, because spending cuts that washington democrats will accept is what is missing from the balanced approach that the president says he wants. clearly, what that tells me, republicans are putting the ball in the white house's court, and democrats' court to come forward with spending
probably gives us a bit more context to house speaker john boehner's response to all of this yesterday. >> no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. >> so, let's not forget here just how close we are to this cliff. cliff day is 32 days away. you might say we're kind of teetering, regardless of what the republicans think, regardless of how loud they may be laughing, the president is awalking. he's taking this pitch on the road, and he is heading as we speak to a suburb in philadelphia to tour a toy factory and give a speech there. but this is not just your average factory. it's not just your average tour. it's not your normal glad-handing here. in fact, the republicans are saying this is just president obama campaigning. they're angry that he's off selling this proposal to the public instead of sitting down at the table with them and negotiating back in washington. it's a great shot, though, to watch marine one take off regardless of how you feel about it. dan lothian gets to watch it's a regular basis. >> reporter:
. of course, some of them will be meeting with house speaker john boehner and senate majority leader harry reid. so the hope is they will put pressure on their lawmakers from their states to get a deal done. but also this is a chance for these governors to talk about the fact that what happens here with this fiscal cliff will have some real consequences, that we're not just talking about sort of these ambiguous numbers but it will impact them and why does it impact them? because according to a pew report, a third of the revenue of states comes from federal grants, and so states -- >> hey, dan, you're not going to believe this. just as you're speaking live, i'm only going to interrupt you for the governors themselves. let's listen in. >> governor beebe of arkansas, we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say was a very good meeting with the president. we came in part to make sure that the voices and the issues that we face as governors in the states are heard and are considered as part of the discussions going on here in washington. the president was very open
want to start with house speaker, john boehner. he was saying on wednesday he was optimistic about a deal. >> republicans are committed to continuing to work with the president to come to an agreement to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. optimistic that we can continue to work together to avert this crisis and sooner rather than later. >> very next day, boehner is suddenly grim, talks having accomplished a thing. >> no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. and this is a moment for adult leadership. campaign-style rallies and leaks in the press are not the way to get things done here in washington. >> all right. susan, you're looking at the monitor and looking at his body language. what is it telling you? >> well, he's an intense guy to begin with. but when he's emphasizing a point, you see his eyebrows flash up, a quick little flash. it's a micro-expression. after that. you see his eyebrows pull together in frustration and anger. no
. negotiations between the who is and congress has stalled, john boehner calling it a stalemate. there are 30 days to go. charles, draw me a picture, how does this end? is staking out their positions, and really coming and enjoying the ring around the area where they are lease protecting where they want to advance, so the presidents and the democrats are basically outlining the increased revenue side of the spectrum. and the republicans are looking at it and saying come to the table and tell us what you're going to do in terms of cutting entitlements and spending. so both of them are now at this phase where it looks like they're at lagger heads. i happen to believe that we don't know what's happening behind the scenes. some of this can just be political posturing, we don't know the discussions that are being had in private and no one wants to be the person who blinks first. the president and democrats say we won, why should we blink first. and boehner is trying to protect his job. he has to keep his promise in congress. and that is going to take some political maneuvering. so i think on the s
house speaker john boehner because this was his reaction to the plan that jessica just ran us through, the white house's plan here speaker boehner got the plan thursday from treasury secretary tim geithner. here he was. >> flabbergasted. you can't be serious. i've just never seen anything like it. >> flabbergasted, he says. 29 days until this automatic tax increase, until the federal spending cuts that, you know, kick into place that can plunge the economy back into recession. and you have the house speaker saying this white house proposal, the one he received just a matter of days ago, isn't even serious. gloria borger, our chief political analyst, let me bring you in here. one of the questions is does it seem to you that the president feels as though he has some leverage here? he won the election, right? >> he did. >> maybe that accounts for what's in his proposal. >> yeah. this is clearly a different president obama than the one we saw during the debt ceiling negotiations or even after the midterm elections in 2010 when he felt a little weakened and there was the extension of those
as democrats and republicans dig in and ramp up the rhetoric on the fiscal cliff. house speaker john boehner and senate majority leader harry reid trading jabs before the cameras on capitol hill. >> going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> speaker boehner made very clear at his press conference that he thinks the ball is in your court and the president's court. he says democrats have got to get series about spending cuts. where is the disconnect? >> i don't understand his brain so you should ask him. okay? >> reid making those comments to our own kate bolduan. i'm joined by dan lothian. dan, we're learning more about the white house plan to deal with the fiscal cliff. break it down for us. >> reporter: right. this is the plan that secretary -- treasury secretary timothy geithner took up to capitol hill yesterday. it calls for $1.6 trillion in tax increases over a ten-year period more than republicans had anticipated. in addition to that, $400 billion in spending cuts that will
and they want the president and john boehner, the republican leadership and democratic leadership to come up with something that avoids going over the fiscal cliff. i think that's what that poll shows. >> let me change topics for a bit. news broke just before the program that republican senator jim demint is leaving. he decided to take over the heritage foundation. i have a question for you in that was this expected? he's a staunch conservative and opponent to craving into democrats and how do those things factor into a way ahead for republicans in the senate? >> i was surprised to hear that jim demint was giving up his senate seat to become head of the heritage foundation, a conservative think tank in washington. it surprised me. i suppose if it surprised me, it surprised a lot of washingtonians as well. i didn't have any indication he was ready to give up that seat from south carolina. running the heritage foundation is an important position in washington. a lot of influence among conservatives, among republicans. i'm sure he's going to have his work cut out for him there. you're right. it
john boehner. he is offering $800 billion in increased revenue. he also wants much deeper cuts in entitlements and $800 billion in other cuts many spending. we've got reporters -- i want to start off with you. dana bash on the hill. a standoff here, republicans essentially saying, look, the president is not being reasonable here, and then you have the white house saying this is magic beans and fairy dust. is this a lot of posturing here? are we really at an impasse? >> yes to both of those questions. there is a lot of post urg, but we do seem to be at an impasse. i want to show our viewers some video that will illustrate just what we're talking about. that is pictures of members of the house of representatives leaving for the week, and now, i don't want tower viewers to get concerned. the calendars on the desk tops are not wrong. it is still wednesday. this did happen at noon on wednesday. it would be nice if all of us could do that, but -- >> yeah, really. >> this is not an accident. republican leaders say that they just simply have nothing to vote on right now on the floor of
for the wealthy. house speaker john boehner wants to close tax loopholes, limit deductions for the wealthy. let's stay on the hill here, let's talk to senior congressional correspondent dana bash. we know the speaker -- we know speaker boehner met with conservative republicans today. did he get any backlash today from his plan? >> reporter: you know what, interestingly it doesn't seem like he did. we know that conservatives are not happy with the idea that their own house republican leadership proposed a plan that includes $800 billion in new revenue. we have seen -- reported on it extensively yesterday and the day before about the e-mail alerts that conservative groups have put out, republican senator jim demint was up-front about the fact he's not happy about it. however, when it comes to speaker boehner's own republican conference, as it is called, we're told they met for an hour and there wasn't backlash, that they were united behind him. it seems as though, brooke, that the speaker has, for now, emphasize for now, been able to turn the frustration within his caucus against the president an
that president obama had a lengthy phone call with house gop leader, the speaker, john boehner. dan lothian is at the white house. dan, what do you know? >> reporter: well, this is the second phone conversation now that the president has had with speaker boehner with regards to the fiscal cliff. this call, according to a source familiar with it, told me it lasted for 28 minutes. this official saying it was hardly short or curt, as had been reported by some news outlets. and my colleague, jessica yellen, heard from another source that said that the president told speaker boehner that he felt that rates had to go up on wealthy americans and that there would be no deal without that. so clearly, there is still some distance between the two sides here. the president believing that wealthy americans need to pay more. those bush era tax cuts should not extend for them. republicans believing that all americans should benefit from those tax cuts, and that now you should put en titlements on the table. of as we see, the officials from the white house going up to capitol hill today, treasury secretary
. >> house speaker john boehner said friday the white house proposal which begins basically with having $1.6 trillion tax increase among other things was essentially a nonstarter. take a listen. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. i'm not trying to make this more difficult. you've watched me over the last three weeks. i have been guarded in what i have to say because i don't want to make it harder for me or the president or members of both parties to be able to find common ground. >> all right, so common ground. the white house is focused on having high earners, the rich, pay higher taxes and get fewing deductions. if that happens, the middle class comes out ahead. so why is there so much push-back by the republicans? >> the proposal the white house came up with is one that they know the republicans aren't going to sign on the dotted line and go along with it. what the president is trying to do is pull the debate more his way. he's learned from the past if you start negotiating with your final position, you don't get a very good deal here. so neither side is really offering up
billion in new cuts to medicare and other entitlement programs. but republican house speaker john boehner flatly rejected the plan on the table and what he calls the white house's unwillingness to compromise. >> i was just flabbergasted. i looked at him, i said, you can't be serious. i've never seen anything like it. you know, we've got seven weeks between election day and the end of the year. and three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense. >> you know, i think right now the best thing to do is for them to come to us and say, look, here's what we think makes sense. we've told them what we think makes sense. what we can't do is try to figure out what's going to be good for them. they have to come tell us. >> house minority leader and democrat nancy pelosi also jumping into the fray. she's renewed threats to bring a middle income tax cut bill to the house floor if boehner refuses to schedule a vote on the cuts this week. we'll keep you posted. >>> for the past six years, you have helped cnn honor the men and women whose efforts in their communities are changing the lives of ot
to avoid the fiscal cliff. but republican house speaker john boehner dismisses it as, and i'm quoting, la la land. the republicans offered their proposal, that happened about 24 hours ago. the white house quickly labels it as nothing new. business as usual, right? so how do we move beyond this stalemate in washington? we heard from the president, just a short time ago. our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin joins me now, jessica, the president spoke out, sat down in an interview with bloomberg tv, and in listening to the interview, did you hear any clues toward a possible compromise here? >> reporter: not new clues, brooke. the president laid down the marker that we heard from the white house consistently, which is they aren't moving until they hear the republicans agree to raise tax rates on the wealthiest. listen to what the president had to say. >> i think that, you know, we have the potential of getting a deal done, but it is going to require what i talked about during the campaign, which is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses
what is really going on behind the scenes, which is real negotiating. so i asked that question of john boehner, who has been through this kind of negotiating many, many times over many years, if that's what we're seeing or if we're at a stalemate. listen to this . the past 24 hours, is this the necessary public posturing that needs to go on to get an endgame or is there serious stalemate right now? >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. i'm not trying to make this more difficult, but if you watched me over the last three weeks, i've been very girded in what i have to say because i don't want to make it harder for me or the president or members of both parties to be able to find common ground. but when i come out the day after the election, and make it clear that republicans will put revenue on the table, i took a great risk. and then the white house spends three weeks trying to develop a proposal and they send one up here, they didn't want to have this extra spending that is actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mean, it is -- it was not a serious propos
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)